A Sunday Chat with Myself—Water!

“And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the water” —Genesis 2:1

There is much argument in the Christian world about the above Biblical passage from the Bible. We are told that God created everything, but yet, if we take a closer look at this passage, it would appear as though water had already existed before God created the universe. Vladimir Voeikov, Director of Science, Professor of Biology, in an interview during a documentary on Gaia TV stated, “Water was not created, and herein is the mystery to which science will not give an answer.”

Regardless of what one believes—whether you believe that this is just another, of many, oversights and/or misprints in the Scriptures, or whether water did already exist prior to creation, one thing is certain: water is an important element not only on earth, but in the entire universe!

Alois Gruber, in the same Gaia TV documentary, explained water in a slightly different light. He said, “how a person handles water, if he approaches the water with good thoughts or blesses it, and says Thank You to it, the quality of water will improve and have a positive effect on a person and his body.” He went on to explain that water absorbs information and if misused, can in time, become quite toxic to creatures who depend on water for nourishment. Fortunately, water is self-cleansing. Frozen water—ice—or in  its steam element, has the ability to clean itself. That’s why water that trickles down from ice shelves, high in the mountains, is sought after as being pure of any  contaminants.

“Pure water is the world’s first and foremost medicine.” —Slovakian Proverb

The healing qualities of water can be easily demonstrated. Pour yourself a glass of water—of course, make sure that it’s filtered, pure water with as many of the contaminants as possible removed. Hold the glass of water in both hands in front of you, then concentrate on it, sending it some positive thoughts. Think of the person you love. Feel that love, then transfer it to the water.

Think of a happy moment: the time that you said “Thank You” to the person that held the door open for you at the supermarket. Feel that gratitude, then transfer it to the glass of water.

Think of a time you paid the cost of lunch for a Street Person. Do you remember how good you felt in your heart that you had helped someone less fortunate than you? Transfer that charitable feeling to the glass of water.

Now, offer a prayer of gratitude to the water: be thankful for the water’s ability to quench your thirst, to rejuvenate you, to heal your ailments. Drink the water. Do this for at least a week and notice the natural difference in your health and in your countenance.

“Water is the mother of the vine, the nurse and fountain of fecundity, the adorner and refresher of the world.” —Charles Mackay

 

A Sunday Chat with Myself: we are eternal: we are God: we can accomplish anything

Our world is not a world of causes, but a world of effects.  —from Studies in Kabbalah

I recently read a very interesting article showing some experiments that were done regarding vibrations that showed, in all reality, there are only two forces to creation: the primary one, consciousness and the secondary one, vibration.

This experiment in vibration showed tiny grains of sand being placed on a hard, flat surface.  Then, the hard surface was vibrated using a fixed Hz. Different frequencies brought about different patterns in the sand.

Although I have taken a mini course in the Kabbalah, I can’t really only call myself  a simple student of the Kabbalah, but what I did learn is that it’s a more comprehensive view of how “God” created our universe, compared to the Biblical book of Genesis which barely touches on the subject. Add the knowledge of these Holy Books to that our accumulated  scientific and metaphysical studies on creation, and it’s easy to see that, in the beginning there was only consciousness.  God was consciousness—the word: the logos!

Whatever the reason, God—Consciousness, wanted to realize itself—become self-aware— so it started vibrating:  expanding itself into various realms of density. In other words, Consciousness set itself into motion. Bingo! Universes of various densities and parallels appeared.

But, what about consciousness itself?

“And God saw every thing that he had made, and, behold, it was very good.” Genesis 1:31

According to the Mystery Schools, there are seven levels of consciousness:

1. the state of waking consciousness;
2. deep sleep;
3. dreaming;
4. transcendental consciousness;
5. cosmic consciousness;
6. god consciousness, and
7, unity consciousness.

Right now, most of us who are reading this article live in the first three levels of consciousness: awakening, deep sleep and dreaming. Although in the heart-of-our-hearts we are all seeking higher levels of consciousness—it’s almost like homesickness. The reason being, we need to create. To expand!

After all, we are gods … and gods create!

A Sunday Chat with Myself—Our Nourishment Habits in the Spirit World

“When your life is filled with the desire to see the holiness in everyday life, something magical happens: ordinary life becomes extraordinary, and the very process of life begins to nourish your soul! ” Rabbi Harold Kushner

A few years back I experienced what is loosely termed—and greatly misunderstood, a Near-death Experience. During that experience I heard a voice very clearly say to me, “Man is not made to eat meat.” I’ve since become a vegetarian. My greatest triumph over having accepted that decision is, whenever a cattle liner loaded with animals headed to a slaughter house passes me—although I still can’t help but send a silent prayer of comfort to those poor animals in that liner—I have a lighter conscience that I am no longer a contributor to that form of indifference and brutality. There was much more to that NDE—in fact, I’ve had two additional NDEs since then, but they can be topics for later musings. This Sunday, I have a single thought. If vegetarianism is a primer leading to eventual higher standards of life, then, especially when I reach the spirit world, what will I  be eating? Or, do we even need nourishment in higher densities?

I’ve given some serious deliberation to this problem because, if life is continuous, and we keep evolving to higher planes—which, by the way, I also believe includes plants, insects, reptiles: in other words, all living things—in fact, including the very earth that we live on—how do we nourish ourselves? And, be you Christian, Buddhist, Atheist or Agnostic, eventually we must all … uh, “die” out of this third density plane! Therefore, eating flesh of any kind, or anything that has/had life in it, will not be a source for sustenance for us in higher dimensions.

“Big-heartedness is the most essential virtue on the spiritual journey.”  Matthew Fox

I know that the whole of the universe is made up of consciousness. In fact, the universe is consciousness. And it is consciousness (God?) that creates energy, which creates matter and form. But, since there will be no death, as we understand death in this third density, we won’t be in a position to “kill” some  other part of creation in order to eat it and sustain ourselves.

Thought (The Logos: The Word), which is the first creative force emanating from consciousness,  creates feelings … and the strongest and prime feeling created is Love!

I remember times when I felt “on top of the world”? I was full of energy; I felt like dancing; I could have kissed everyone that I met and wish them the same happy feeling that I was having. And oh,  how I wished that this”happy feeling” would live on forever!

That’s what I’ll be experiencing  in the planes—densities— beyond this one. Not only will I be sumptuously dining on this glorious feeling, I will also be radiating this feeling to all the created spirits in the universe!

It is this Happy Feeling, this Love that  will be mine to dine on when I graduate to higher realms.

Love—Eternal Bliss—is the Spirit-Food that we will quaff on, and freely share with our neighbors in our worlds to come.

A Sunday Chat with Myself (How Big is God?)

Don’t tell God that you have a big problem. Tell your problem that you have a big God!

The question of how big is God, is still a growing one with me, where I learn something new on the topic almost daily.  When I was a child and went to Sunday School, I imagined (was taught?) God to be a man, not much taller than my grandpa, who had a long white beard and walked around on clouds all day dressed in a long white robe, muttering and grumbling about this thing not being right, or that thing not acting like it should. To me, in my childhood, God was an angry god who constantly threatened that if we didn’t attend church regularly and give Him a lot of money, then when I died, He’d throw me into hell where I’d burn forever. At the time, that was more than enough for me to mind my parents—well, most of the time—and never, ever miss Sunday School. I knew that getting burnt by fire was a really painful experience—and to burn forever in a lake of brimstone and fire?I was really scared of God!

However, as I grew older and began to learn more about what constituted life, creation in general, and the cosmos as something larger than the clouds above me where God dwelt, my views of God started to change. I still saw God as a grouchy old man with a short fuse, but now He had elevated himself. He lived somewhere in the heavens a little higher up than the clouds, and He was a bit larger and more powerful than my grandpa.

“Lo, these are parts of his ways: but how little a portion is heard of him? but the thunder of his power who can understand?” — Job 26:14

My evolutionary understanding of what God is, has come a lo-o-o-ng  way that changed direction several times from childhood to my present. There was even a time when, as I saw the universe as an infinite, expanding place, I could not fit a physical God into it, for where would He reside in this universe? Where could his home be? I became a devout atheist! I rationalized that it was physically impossible for a god to rule infinity—and, from where would He rule, to begin with? Also, as a near infinite tiny speck in this creation, how could any god even know that I existed? Relative in size to the universe, how could God even see me, let alone hear any of my prayers?

“What is man, that thou art mindful of him?” — Psalm 8:4

My vision of what I thought God is, really fast tracked for me when, fairly recently, I was introduced to Zecharia Sitchin’s books, in particular, “The 12th planet,” and “There were giants upon the earth.” Suddenly, I saw humanity’s—including my own—version of (now Gods) suddenly  becoming plural: see Genesis 3:22) as giant extraterrestrials who had genetically modified us, first, as servants to the Anunnaki, then, thanks to Enki (now called Jesus, the Christ), we were engineered to “fall,” and become self-conscious, thinking beings: the Adapa (Adam) species were created on earth! This even explained why anthropology never had an answer as to where we came (evolved) from. They couldn’t find that missing link, and, that is most likely because we didn’t evolve from lower species, like anthropology claimed, but were created—not in a Biblical version by a grumpy old man, but by giant extraterrestrials who did, in all reality, come to earth “from the heavens,” and had their home “in the heavens.”

But, all this raised another. If the giants—the Anunnaki—created us—and out of their own gene pool—where is the god of my childhood?

Gregg Braden, in his “Missing Links” series on Gaia TV, claims that we could well be living in a giant, holographic universe, and stated: “our act, the act of us looking with the expectation that we will see something, is an act of creation within our simulated universe.” In other words, what we are looking for, and think we’ve found, we create it!

It seems like, in my quest to find and understand God, my search first went out to explore the clouds above me, then the infinite universe. Then, like a well balanced boomerang, my crusade came right back to me and showed me: I am my own God! I am the conscious creator of my world. Collectively, consciousness created the universe and its infinite possibilities. And I am part of that collective, conscious creation!

How cool is that, eh?

 

Amazing intelligence in animals—Elephants journey to pay their respects


This short story was first published in the Temple City Star on 22 February, 2018

“Perhaps measuring animal intelligence by comparing it to human intelligence isn’t the best litmus test” — Ingrid Newkirk

We’ve learned, even as children, that elephants are supposed to have a good memory, but that’s not the only attribute they possess. Elephants are also very respectful, and they can show gratitude for kindness offered them.

For example, Lawrence Anthony, born 17 September, 1950 in Johannesburg, is a legend in Africa. Author of three books, he’s also known as The Elephant Whisperer because of his many charitable deeds in rescuing animals, including elephants. Although no elephants were involved in this particular rescue, he played an influential role in the rescue of the Baghdad Zoo animals during the United State’s invasion of Iraq in 2003.

Anthony died on March 7th, 2012 in Johannesburg, South Africa. Now for the interesting part! The African elephants sensed Anthony’s passing, so two days after his death, led by two large matriarchs, a total of 31 elephants patiently, solemnly, walked slowly, reverently, in single file, over 12 hours, to get to his house to pay their respects. They stayed 2 days and 2 nights without eating (fasting), then made their long journey back to their home territories.

Yes, Virginia, “Something in the universe is greater and deeper than what we’re superficially led to believe!”

A Sunday Chat with Myself (Experience)

“Experience is the teacher of all things.” –julius Caesar

It seems curious to me that, when we talk about what living the perfect life might be like, we think of life lived as we see in a Lotto 649 ad: exciting!–like diving off high cliffs into azure pools below, relaxing with invited friends on deck of our own personal luxury cruise yacht, laughing and partying with not a care in the world. Yet, when one hears years later about these lotto winners who’ve tried this type of life,  the majority of them–or anyone, for that matter, who tries to live the good life as advertised by these get-rich-quick companies as the perfect dream-life, we see total disaster.

From all this I gather that such an artificial life–unearned luxuries–isn’t what we came here on earth to experience. Yes, dreaming big is part of our purpose, and it’s a noble purpose, but dreaming big involves effort and personal involvement on our part in order to accomplish those dreams. Then we can say to the Universe, “I’ve earned my accomplishments!

I can clearly remember, many, many years ago when I was still a kid living my innocence on a farm in central Saskatchewan. It was the middle of the 1930s. The whole country was still agonizing itself through the Great Depression, and effects of that terrible time were present everywhere. But, still, we considered ourselves to be among the lucky ones: we lived on a farm where we raised chickens, ducks, geese, pigs, cows and had two teams of work horses that we used in working the grain fields, so if we had nothing else, we always had plenty to eat. Yes, our mother often had to sew patches over already worn out or torn patches on our clothes, but that was life in those days. Everyone was in the same boat.

Since we lived less than a quarter of a mile from the Canadian National Railway that linked Canada from east to west, we saw a lot of out-of-work Eastern “Railroad Bums”  riding the rails  to Alberta in search of a better chance at employment. Often thirsty and hungry, many would jump off the moving rail cars and stop at our farm to ask for a handout. Money, of course, was out of the question, since we never had any money ourselves, so we were unable to help anyone else, financially.

But mother always made sure that she had a pot of something on the stove so that our “temporary guests” didn’t leave on an empty stomach, and that usually included  packing a tick, double-sliced beef sandwich on fresh, homemade bread to take with them for their remaining journey to a better future.

It’s funny … not  like today, in those days, we never treated these “Railroad Bums” with suspicion: that they might want to rob us, or were perverts running from the law. We knew that they were someone’s husband, father, or son, who had the misfortune of being caught up in the Great Depression, and were looking for work–somewhere, anywhere, as long as it provided an income so that they could feed their families. It was our Christian duty to show compassion to those men who were less fortunate than we were.

It was exactly these hard, depressive times that taught our community compassion. But, it was a youthful experience during this depressive hard time that taught me, personally, the difference between showing compassion, and letting a person work out their own destiny in their own time, in their own way, without my interference.

As I said, we had chickens on our farm and it was usually us children’s job to go around to all the chicken’s hiding places around the yard and stables to collect the eggs for the day. Occasionally, the chickens were smarter than we were, and hid their laying nests so well that we didn’t always find them–that is, not until many days later when the hens had brooded their eggs to the point where they began to hatch, and we’d only spot the nests after little chicks were running everywhere.

I recall one particular incident when my younger brother and I were on an egg-gathering mission. We came across a hidden nest where some chicks were already hatched, but other chicks were still in various stages of breaking through their eggshells. My brother and I decided to give these partially hatched chicks a hand by breaking the shells for them, saving them the effort. Unfortunately, this proved a disaster! To our dismay, all the chicks that we tried to help, died while still in their shell! What went wrong? Weren’t we showing compassion?

It wasn’t until many, many years later, and weathering many of the bumps and bruises life has to offer , before I learned that God has a reason for giving us challenges: to break out of our own eggshells on our own, without outside help. He has a reason for making us apply effort to achieve anything worthwhile in life. We need challenges and setbacks in life in order for us to grow, spiritually!

I know of persons where, when everything is just handed to a person born with the proverbial silver spoon in their mouth, that person became lazy and self-centred. They often just frit away the business worth that their father had built through his hard work.  They often become selfish and uncaring, and before long, they’re spiritually dead, much like those chicks that we tried to help years ago, became physically dead because we tried to give them something for nothing.

There is a reason for trials and shortcomings. They are not punishments from a wrathful or uncaring God. They are there to help one grow: to learn to love: to show compassion, so that I can, eventually, become the god I am meant to become!

A Sunday Chat with Myself — 28 January, 2018

“Knowledge is the life of the mind”— Abu Bakr

One of my favorite poems is “Vestigia,” by Bliss Carman

“I took a day to search for God, and found Him not.  But as I trod by rocky ledge, through woods untamed , Just where one scarlet lily flamed, I saw His footprint in the sod …”

At present, I’m reading a very interesting book, “Children of a Living Universe,” by Paul Von  Ward. The author states, “A review of present conventional religious and scientific assumptions is necessary.” He continues, “most of what groups now label truth would have to be considered tentative, but not fact.” I tend to agree with the author;  creation is in a constant state of flux, assumed truths and mistruths. For example, according to Reference.com, there are a whopping 4,200 religions in the world today. Each one professes to “know the truth, to claim (know) their version of the word of God to be the only true word, and boldly claim that all other religions, except their own, have at least some wrong–mistruth–in them.”

So I ask, if I want to know God–the true God, which religion do I join?

Another burning question: countless wars have been fought over whether our universe came into being via the Big Bang, or whether God created the univers out of nothing–which, of course, begs another question, is there even a God?

Was the Garden of Eden really the birthplace of mankind, or was Zacharia Sitchin, in his book, “The 12th Planet,” more correct when he claimed, that “Life, scientist have concluded, evolved not upon the terrestrial planets … but in the outer fringes of the solar system.”?

If most of our history is written by the victor, what is mankind’s true history?

Heraclitus is credited with having said, “The only thing that is constant is change.” Is that the same as saying, the only truth in the universe is change?  Is  Heraclitus saying that change is God? If every creation in our universe boils down to that simple quote, I can see mankind’s destiny as utter madness. Is there no stability, no anchor that we can fix our hopes and dreams on?

I believe that, if I ever want to find truth–real, eternal truth–I have to look inside myself, for nowhere else can it be. Inside of me I see Love. Love always has been. Love always will be–as the old cliche goes, hiding in plain sight from my frivolous mind. Love is eternal. Love never changes, and can be depended upon to always fulfill.

Love, with its opposite quality, hate,  is, beyond question, the primary, the most stable, the most powerful truth upon which the entire universe is built, and is the foundation upon which all other truths are based. Love and hate are the cornerstones upon which all my other experiences are built. What hate destroys in me, love can heal and resuscitate.

I can therefore conclude that recorded history–or any point therein– is volatile. It’s not constant. What seemed true to a nation yesterday, is no longer true today. If I unravel that history’s  seemingly whole into parts–into separate acts, I see that many of its pieces have changed, but where love or hate played a part at the time, the same result is today as it was then.

Through my rage/hate–let’s say as a Roman soldier–I burnt a peasant’s home and killed its occupants. The rage was the same then as it would be today, and its manifestation the same as if I go, today, and raze a jungle village in the Amazon in order to make room for my oil rig. Politics, opinions, justifications change: therefore they can’t be classified as Eternal Truths. But manifested hate, or rage then, in Roman times, as it would today, or any other time in our history, can be classified as an eternal truth.

Another, positive example this time: let’s say I become aware of the plight of refugee children in some war-torn country today. I take my funds and build them an orphanage with all its amenities to help ease their suffering. In other words, I have come to love these children. The manifestation of that love is the same–a constant–today as it would have been for the compassionate person who built the first hostel to ease the discomfort of the weary travellers along the ancient Chinese Silk Trade Route. Love, like its opposite, hate, is a constant.

Love and hate aren’t the only constants in our universe. There’s charity, with its opposite, greed; compassion with its opposite, indifference; morality with its opposite, immorality; industrious with its opposite, sloth, and let’s not forget intelligence with its opposite, stupidity!

These are all constants throughout the universe: unchanging, eternal. Did I finally find God?

 

A Sunday Chat with Myself — 14 January, 2018

Health is not valued until sickness comes. 

For a good many years of my life I’ve had an interest in sound–body healing sound, that is. I believe that sound is what created our universe; sound is energy, and energy is sound. Our earth has a vibrational frequency–7.82 herz, our bodies each have their own unique vibration, and to complicate things even more, all our organs within our body each vibrate at their own frequency!

” You can look at disease as a form of disharmony. And there’s no organ system in the body that’s not affected by sound and music and vibration.” — Mitchell Gaynor, M.D., Sounds of Healing 

I have absolutely no issue with doctors, or visiting a doctor’s office when necessary, but I also believe that God gave me a body and part of my responsibility during my stay here on earth is to care and look after it. In other words, if I get sick, my first thought is to see if I can find a cure for what ails me. If the sickness, or injury, is beyond my capability, then will I seek professional medical help.

During my many years of searching for self-cures, I found that, by using proper frequencies of sound, coupled with a healthy diet, I’ve confirmed that I can do a pretty good job of healing most of my minor ailments.

“It is more Important to be of pure intention than of perfect action.”  ― Ilyas Kassam 

The problem with many MP3 soundtracks that I open, or download to use in my meditation and healing ceremonies is that, although they may be perfectly presented, they lack one major ingredient: Intent! Plainly stated, did the artist of that music intend to create a perfect piece of music, or was his intent to touch my soul with his musical creation? It may come as a surprise to many, but with music, as with any great work of art, you leave your signature–your soul–your meaning–your intent in your finished piece. You may have noticed this yourself when listening to music. The same song, played by two different artists: one falls flat, the other, you purchase the record. It is no different in the art world. Same scene, two different artists. One artist can’t give his work away, the other artist becomes famous for his work.

Intent plays an important role in how we present ourselves to the world.

I wonder. What was God’s intention when He created the world through sound?

A Sunday Chat with Myself – Sunday, December 3rd, 2017

“Men like that — when they know they won’t be found out — they will do anything.” 
― Michelle Paver

I’m the secretary of our Cardston Home Safe Animal Rescue Society and one of my tasks that I’ve undertaken is to create monthly posters advertising compassion to animals, and distribute them to the bulletin boards of select businesses in town.

After completing the poster, I couldn’t help but reflect on just how insensitive humans are when it comes to dealing with Nature,–not just lost and abandoned pets, but Nature in general. For example, now with the holiday season upon us, many a parent will consider getting a puppy or kitten as a Christmas gift for a family member.

“They’re so cute and adorable!” We hug the animal, maybe even kiss it. “We’re going to take such good care of you and you’re going to be part of our family!” we fondly chortle. At the moment, everything sounds so good and mushy. However, a week after Christmas, when faced with a cleanup job after the kitten or puppy accidently pooped on our beautiful rug, out the door goes the pet, and with the same intensity of passion in which the animal was adopted, it is now abandoned, left to face the cold elements on its own! Forgotten!

But pets and Nature in general aren’t the only things that suffer as a result of our indifference. We’re just as mean and cruel to each other!

I do believe in karma and, although karma can sometimes be delayed to manifest in our lives another day, I  believe that many of the calamities that happen in our lives are a result of our actions. If we are prone to gossip, should we expect people to trust us? If we are flighty and inconsistent in our thoughts and behavior, should we expect stability in our lives? If we frequently get angry at our children and call them stupid, should we expect our children to love us and care for us in our old age?

I listened to an interviewee this morning who was describing his life in Yugoslavia under the Nazi occupation. He was lamenting the fact that no one stood up to defend their neighbor, or each other, under the strict rules imposed on them by the Nazis. This is why Naziism was so successful for so long, because so few people in the occupied lands stood up against them, and I believe that this is the reason so many of us have to suffer because no one is prepared to stand up for justice for the weak, including our animals and Nature in general. In frustration, I often have to conclude that we deserve what we get!

“People speak sometimes about the “bestial” cruelty of man, but that is terribly unjust and offensive to beasts, no animal could ever be so cruel as a man, so artfully, so artistically cruel.”― Fyodor Dostoyevsky