A Sunday Chat with Myself—”Food Waste”

Love and Food are meant for sharing, not for wasting

I’m sorry, but this morning my column is going to be mostly a rant, and it’s going to be about food waste, because I think food waste is getting completely out of control, and what I glean from statistics, we—yes, including myself—aren’t doing much to stop it, and unless we change our habits, we’re going to ruin our beautiful planet—or, should I be more accurate and say our planet is going to destroy us!

That statement should come as no surprise, because Gaia—Mother Earth, has nearly wiped us off her face on several occasions during our short while on earth, and I would guess for similar reasons that we again face near extinction.

I recently bought a bundle of those juice-sweet, Mandarin-like oranges that are shipped in from Peru. Some of them still had green spots on the skin and still tasted a little bitter, so I left them in the fridge for a week to ‘ripen.’ However, rather than ripen, I found that they started to rot! So, other than possibly storing them wrong, not in a non-professional way like they would be in warehouses, what else went wrong?

I’m too disgusted to dig into the mechanics of how these oranges came from Peru and ended up in our grocery store, but my guess is, they were picked green in Peru, then put on ships that were Canada-bound, stored in warehouses and there ‘force-ripened’ before being shipped to grocery stores. As a result, they did turn ‘orange,’ like regular oranges do, but never had the opportunity to naturally ripen on the vine as fruit is meant to do, to naturally develop their sugars and nutrients that these oranges are famous for.

The result? Besides beginning to rot, they were too bitter and too ‘leathery’ to eat, so they had to be thrown out!

Wasted!

“The greatest threat to our planet is the belief that someone else will save it.” —Robert Swan

Then, I read on the FastCompany web site that, “nearly 870 million people in the world are undernourished, but at the same time, approximately one-third of the global food total supply ends up spoiled, thrown out [like I had to do with the oranges], or wasted. That’s about 1.6 billion tons of edible material overall, and projected to reach 2.1 billon tons by 2030.”

Then, a new report by the Boston Consulting Group has “quantified the problem in terms of cold hard cash: The world’s food loss and waste is projected to be about $1.2 trillion per year by 2030.

After reading these reports, I no longer have to wonder why my food bill is so high and why we can’t feed the world, resulting in people actually starving to death! The high cost of food, including the orchestrated scarcity of the food problem doesn’t lie with the producer, nor the consumer, but gets discretely and deliberately hidden within our habits of how we handle food.

I know, there are analysts who prefer more socially acceptable words like, unaware, mismanagement and demand in their reports, but when you blow all the dust off the deliberate cover-ups—the socially acceptable phrases— you end up with the real reason: greed and sloth on the marketing and distribution of food!!

Greed plays a factor in this. The greedy person is usually quite good at deflecting his condition, and make it sound like we should actually envy him. Greed is good for the economy!  Greed wallows in its own luxuries, offering up such comforting, socially acceptable words and phrases like, envy, needed, desirable, to lull us into believing “all is well with the world, just go and tend to your own little backyard incidents, and never mind me.”

And did I mention that greed—accumulation of excessive goods and wealth—is not synonymous with happiness? There’s research out there (again, I just don’t feel like searching for links and posting them here right now) that shows a good number of rich folks live quite a frustrated life, and in fear of losing the wealth that they have accumulated. They have to build security walls around their homes to protect them from the commoners!

That’s not happiness!

“Impossible isn’t something that can’t be done. It’s just something that hasn’t been done before.”

Large factory farms, both in the meat, dairy, egg, fruit and vegetable and grain industries, are the biggest contributors to food waste. They are forever getting larger, inventing new ways to produce more food, at a cheaper cost to them—causing ever more food waste—but there is little or no indication that their penchant for producing ever-more food is actually solving the scarcity of food that could be shipment to underdeveloped areas, nor any real savings for the consumer. Don’t be fooled into thinking that all this extra food produced by these mega factory farms is actually bringing cheaper food to your table. If it were truly so, then there would be no starving people in the world today! Besides, when we do find actual instances of “cheaper” food, it is also of a lower quality than it used to be a generation ago, so you are not getting a good bang for your buck! My oranges that I mentioned at the beginning of this rant, are a good example of what I mean.

On the plus side of managing our food bill and what we “commoners” can do about it. The David Suzuki Foundation has some excellent ways in which we, as individuals can not only save on our own grocery bill, and at the same time, reduce waste, world-wide.

  • Meal planning. My wife has a monthly meal planner that she consults before doing any grocery shopping. It’s helped to reduce buying stuff she hadn’t planned on using in making meals, thus there’s little left over that could go to waste.
  • Make lots of soup. When food gets close to the expiry date, making soup out of it is an excellent and nutritious way to use up those older vegetables.
  • Leftover food does not have to be thrown out. Place the leftovers in freezer bags and use them at a later date.
  • Create an Eat-Me-First bin in your refrigerator. In that way, it is less likely that you will ever have spoilt food to consider in your meal planning.

With a bit of serious planning, one can easily find any number of ways to cut back on food waste—and need I mention our misuse of plastic bags? Also, if you see “bargains” at the grocery store, check carefully to see if it truly is a bargain, and not just a ploy to have you buy a cheaper quality food for that lower “bargain” price!

Food waste is not a community or government problem—however, admittedly, they can help—but it has to start with the individual—me—and the family—we. This is such a beautiful, wonderful planet that we live on, and technology has helped us enjoy Nature’s abundance to hights undreamed of in the past! Just imagine how wonderful it would be if all of us took waste seriously.

Waste is not the world’s problem: it’s my problem!

We are trashing our land to grow food no one eats.”

About Albert Schindler

I was born on the 27th of February, 1931, on a farm near Hubbard, Saskatchewan. As far back as I can remember I had a spirit that would not stay earthbound. In junior high, I remember taking first place for a short story in which I described my terrifying encounter with a dinosaur. In outer space – that is, when the teacher wasn’t directly speaking to me, I went where Buck Rogers wouldn’t dare go. I was more of a Calvin in Calvin and Hobbes type of guy, with my own, personal, very powerful, transmogrifyer always at the ready. In my ‘teens and twenties, I pushed aside my Calvin alter ego in favour of making a living and didn’t take seriously again my ‘writer’s bug’ until my late 30s. I still saw that the world as full of exciting things to learn and investigate, which my writing reflected in the several articles and a couple of short fiction pieces that I wrote and sold, including over 30 children’s radio plays for Alberta’s ACCESS Radio. Unfortunately, I abandoned my budding writing career in favour of starting my own business as a sign painter. Now that I can officially call myself ‘retired,’ I plan to resume my writing career, only this time, writing mostly fiction. Why fiction? I have lead a great, adventurous life in which I made many mistakes (the ‘adventure’ in life), that have taught me some very important lessons and allowed my spirit to grow to unimaginable proportions, inconceivable to me while still in my thirties. In fiction, I believe, one can adventure into both the inner and outer consciousness of man and the universe to infinite levels where only the boldest dare peak. Convention holds that article writing has to be factual – oh, you can be creative in how you present your information, but ‘fact’ (whatever that means) still must have its parameters in article writing, whereas fiction is limited only by the size of a writer’s spirit, and so far, I haven’t been able to fathom my limit.
This entry was posted in food, Garbage, Global Pollution, Waste and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.